Ed’s Trail on Silver Star Mountain

Sunday, July 1, 2018

Greg and I hiked up Silver Star last weekend via the Grouse Vista Trailhead. Mom and Dad wanted to see the grand wildflower display on Silver Star Mountain. They don’t hike at all anymore and they wouldn’t have been able to handle the rough trail from Grouse Vista, so we knew we had to take them to the north side, even though the road is utter crap.

On Sunday Karl, Deb, Dad, Mom, and I piled into Karl’s truck and drove up there. Road 4109 is even worse than last year. I got my Outback up that road last year, but I probably wouldn’t have made it up this year. This is what the road looks like now, as photographed on our way down. This is the worst of the ditches:

Road 4109

Nice driving, Karl! We made it! There was only one other truck there when we arrived at 8:30.

Silver Star Mountain

Unfortunately we were very much in the clouds with no views:

Silver Star Mountain

We headed up the trail:

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

There were wildflowers all over the place:

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Visibility was very limited:

Silver Star Mountain

The vegetation was sopping wet (we ran into some backpackers who said it rained pretty much all night), which had some beautiful effects:

Silver Star Mountain

We turned off of the old road and headed up Ed’s Trail. We were lucky to be here during a good beargrass year:

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

The wildflower show continued:

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

I love this part, where the trail crosses a huge meadow:

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

We cut over to the old road from Ed’s Trail in order to avoid some scrambling sections coming on Ed’s Trail:

Silver Star Mountain

Shortly after that we stopped for a break on some rocks above Ed’s Trail, which you see at the bottom of this photo:

Silver Star Mountain

Then we continued hiking the old road towards the summit:

Silver Star Mountain

Almost to the summit! (Notice the two switchback-cutters popping out onto the trail up there):

Silver Star Mountain

We made it! The “views” were pretty cloudy:

Silver Star Mountain

Here’s Karl looking out over Star Creek. Normally you’d be able to see Mt. St. Helens, Mt. Rainier, and Mt. Adams out there, but not today:

Silver Star Mountain

We followed the old road all the way back to the car, hiking past thousands more wildflowers:

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Sturgeon Rock:

Silver Star Mountain

On the way down the clouds lifted a bit, but not enough for us to see Mt. St. Helens, Mt. Rainier, and Mt. Adams

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

As we neared the end, though, a bit of Mt. St. Helens came out:

Silver Star Mountain

Mt. Hood hiding in the clouds:

Silver Star Mountain

Mom wasn’t a fan of these really rocky sections, but she and Dad did great!

Silver Star Mountain

We got back to the trailhead at 2:30 and then we bumped our way down the road. There were seven cars parked along the road, having bailed on their way up when it got too rough. Some of the cars were partially blocking the road.

We stopped in Battleground at Double Mountain Brewing for some post-hike food and beer:

Double Mountain Brewing

I could have done without the clouds, but the flowers were beautiful. So glad we were able to get Mom and Dad up there to see them. Great day!

Video:

Silver Star Mountain via Grouse Vista

June 24, 2018

The first time I visited Silver Star Mountain in 2006 I went with my sister and we took our Dad’s pickup because the road was described as being pretty rough. Back then we drove Road 41 and Road 4109 from Sunset Campground and it was a bit of an adventure, with rough potholed roads.

I’ve been back numerous times since then, eventually switching to a slightly different route via Road 1100 (much better road) that connected up with Road 4109 for the last 2.7 miles. Those last 2.7 miles have been getting worse and worse over the years, and after driving it last year in our Outback, Greg and I vowed we’d never drive that road again. (I actually traveled on that road the next weekend, but not in my car.)

So Greg and I headed to the Grouse Vista Trailhead today to hike up that way (here is a description of the hike). The road access is much better. We got up very early to avoid the crowds and the heat and started hiking at 7:30am. The trail is an old road and it starts out steeply, climbing up through the trees. Large rocks litter the old roadbed.

Silver Star Mountain

This cute rabbit was on the trail ahead of us. He held still for a surprisingly long time before finally hopping away.

Silver Star Mountain

After gaining 600′ in three-quarters of a mile the trail leveled out a bit for awhile:

Silver Star Mountain

Around the one-mile mark we emerged out into some open areas and we could see ahead to Sturgeon Rock (left of center):

Silver Star Mountain

Looking back down the trail:

Silver Star Mountain

Ugly clearcuts:

Silver Star Mountain

Then we were back in the trees:

Silver Star Mountain

And back into the open. The wildflowers were nice on this stretch:

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

The steep rockiness continued. This trail is in very bad condition.

Silver Star Mountain

After 3.1 miles and 1700′ elevation gain we reached the junction with the summit spur trail. Last push to the summit!

Silver Star Mountain

We lucked into a clear day with views of the Cascade volcanoes. Mt. St. Helens and Mt. Rainier:

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Mt. St. Helens and Mt. Rainier and Mt. Adams:

Silver Star Mountain

Mt. Hood:

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Sturgeon Rock with yucky haze on the horizon beyond:

Silver Star Mountain

After leaving the summit we took the side trail towards the Indian Pits hoping to see beargrass, but there wasn’t much there so we didn’t go all the way. Mt. Hood loomed in the distance:

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Back on the main route we descended back to our car, passing numerous people heading up. It was really warming up by this point and I was glad to be going down, not up. Here’s a shot looking back up the trail (that’s Sturgeon Rock in the background):

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

We got back to the car at 1:30. The final mile was pretty grueling. It was impossible to maintain any rhythm on the descent because of all the rocks on the trail. I had to pick my way along, navigating the rocky obstacle course. It was as mentally challenging as it was physically exhausting since I had to concentrate on every step so that I didn’t fall on the rocky trail.

Although this route has better road access, the trail doesn’t even compare to the route on the north side, which is MUCH more scenic, with way more views and flowers. But of course that trailhead requires driving on a wretched road.

Here’s video of our hike:

Coyote Wall Loop

Saturday, March 31, 2018

Note: Watch for ticks and poison oak if you hike here.

Greg and I headed out to Coyote Wall to do a loop hike there. We hit the trail at 9:15 under chilly overcast skies. If you hike here, please note that dogs must be on-leash:

Coyote Wall Hike

We saw this group at the beginning of the hike and later on as well. The dog was never on a leash:

Coyote Wall Hike

We trekked down old Highway 14:

Coyote Wall Hike

The desert parsley was going gangbusters. We saw lots of it.

Coyote Wall Hike

Coyote Wall Hike

At 0.4mi we passed the trail where we would come out later:

Coyote Wall Hike

Further along at 0.7mi we picked up our trail and started climbing up.

Coyote Wall Hike

Coyote Wall Hike

Coyote Wall Hike

Columbia Desert Parsley:

Coyote Wall Hike

Despite the clouds we managed to get a view of Mt. Hood:

Coyote Wall Hike

The river was glassy calm:

Coyote Wall Hike

There was popcorn flower EVERYWHERE:

Coyote Wall Hike

Coyote Wall Hike

Coyote Wall Hike

Avalanche Lilies:

Coyote Wall Hike

Yellow bells:

Coyote Wall Hike

Coyote Wall Hike

First balsamroot sighting of the season!

Coyote Wall Hike

The sun started to break through a bit as we hiked down:

Coyote Wall Hike

By this time we were encountering huge numbers of people. And we were witnessing plenty of bad hiker behavior: picked wildflowers left on the trail, off-leash dogs, dog poop bags left behind, and adults, kids, and dogs wandering through the meadows, trampling the wildflowers. It was discouraging, and we were glad to get back to the trailhead. Still, despite all that, it was a great hike. Here are all the wildflowers Greg noted seeing on this loop. 6 miles, 1100′ elevation gain.

Coyote Wall Track

First Catherine Creek Visit of 2018

March 17, 2018

Note: Watch for ticks and poison oak if you hike here.

Greg and I made our first Catherine Creek trek of the year today. It didn’t rain, but it was partly cloudy and pretty windy! I didn’t take a ton of photos, but I have a video at the end of this post.

Catherine Creek Hike

We started off behind these two women who walked right past the “dogs must be on leash” sign with their dog off-leash. We saw them later in the hike and the dog was still off-leash.

Catherine Creek Hike

Things are starting to green up!

Catherine Creek Hike

Catherine Creek Hike

Once we got up on top with the big sloping meadow we were pummeled by the wind:

Catherine Creek Hike

Catherine Creek Hike

We started getting a little bit more blue sky:

Catherine Creek Hike

It was a relief when we picked up the old road and started descending. We were out of the open and now protected from the relentless wind:

Catherine Creek Hike

We crossed Catherine Creek then picked up another old road going up past the old corral:

Catherine Creek Hike

We looped around over the top near the arch where we were back in the wind:

Catherine Creek Hike

We dropped down to the road and walked back to the car. Great loop today! Could have done without the wind, but that’s the Gorge for you. 5 miles, 1400′ elevation gain.

CatCreek

Tracy Hill

Saturday, March 11, 2018

What a gorgeous day! Greg was out of town so I did a solo hike at Tracy Hill, which is in the Catherine Creek area in the Columbia River Gorge. My start point was just a short distance east down the road from the main Catherine Creek trailhead.

The trail starts out on an old jeep track. On this crystal clear day I started getting views of Mt. Hood right away:

Tracy Hill Hike

There were still a few grass widows around:

Tracy Hill Hike

I also saw plenty of gold stars:

Tracy Hill Hike

I love the ponderosa pines here:

Tracy Hill Hike

Tracy Hill Hike

At 0.8 mile there is a junction where I went straight. The jeep track from the left would bring me back here at the end of the hike. I continued hiking uphill, then the track turned into a trail and emerged into a huge sloping meadow:

Tracy Hill Hike

As I got higher, the views got better. The snowy bump at center is Lookout Mountain:

Tracy Hill Hike

And Mt. Hood was glorious!

Tracy Hill Hike

1.9 miles into the hike I reached the top of the meadow where someone has made a makeshift bench. It’s a great spot to stop and enjoy the views, which is exactly what I did.

Tracy Hill Hike

Tracy Hill Hike

I loved the gnarled branches on this old oak tree:

Tracy Hill Hike

I spotted a lizard in this hole. See him?

Tracy Hill Hike

How about now?

Tracy Hill Hike

The trail passes through an oak forest:

Tracy Hill Hike

And emerges into another meadow with yet another view of Mt. Hood:

Tracy Hill Hike

I passed an old cattle pond that is fed by a spring:

Tracy Hill Hike

I wanted to get further up the hill and pick up another old jeep track so I left the trail and cut up through the meadow, although it turns out if I had stayed on the trail a bit further I would have intersected a path that headed uphill. I found said path as I got higher:

Tracy Hill Hike

The trail connected with another old jeep track:

Tracy Hill Hike

Which entered a very pleasant forest:

Tracy Hill Hike

At the three-mile mark I came to a more developed-looking road:

Tracy Hill Hike

This spot was also the site of some logging:

Tracy Hill Hike

I made this my turnaround point. Back out in the open meadows I put down my sit pad on the trail and sat down to enjoy the view for awhile:

Tracy Hill Hike

Tracy Hill Hike

I had a good view of the Columbia Hills to the east. Great place to see balsamroot in about six weeks!

Tracy Hill Hike

After soaking up the sunshine for awhile I continued on. The trail descended down into the canyon of Catherine Creek:

Tracy Hill Hike

Tracy Hill Hike

A peek at the Columbia River as the trail descends:

Tracy Hill Hike

I picked up another jeep track:

Tracy Hill Hike

Which connected me back to the original trail where I returned to my car. It was a 6.5 mile loop with 1,700′ elevation gain. Great hike!

Here is my track:

TracyHillTrack

And here is the video:

Lewis River Waterfalls

On Saturday we headed to the Lewis River hoping to see some nice fall color. We were WAY too early, though (by 2-3 weeks, I’d guess) and it was still pretty green. It was still a lovely hike, though. Shockingly enough I have never done this trail, despite a decade of hiking around here!

A quick note about access. It seems that guidebooks direct everyone to drive up I5 then head east through Woodland on 503. That’s the way we went, but we came back by heading south on Road 30 then down to Carson. That route is much prettier. Both routes are equally curvy. Bring the dramamine!

We started off at the Lower Falls then headed upstream.

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Apparently there’s a landslide past this point, so the trail detours up to the Middle Falls Trailhead. Instead of a clear sign explaining this, the Forest Service has opted for a mess of pink flagging. Ugh.

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This is what it looks like at the other end on the lower bridge over Copper Creek:

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Copper Creek Falls:

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Middle Falls:

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The trail has slumped away near Middle Falls and is quite a mess. I don’t know when this happened, but it doesn’t look recent:

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Upper Falls:

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We didn’t go any further than Upper Falls because it was starting to rain. So we turned and headed back for the car. Lovely trail! Can’t believe it took me this long to hike it.

Video:

Backpacking to Bear Lake

With HOT weather in the Labor Day forecast and no AC at home we wanted to head to the mountains to literally chill out. We thought about backpacking to Wall Lake (west of Olallie Lake) but thought there might be too much smoke, so headed to Indian Heaven instead, even though we knew it would be packed there. When we arrive at the East Crater Trailhead at 11am Saturday morning the car said it was 78 degrees, but it felt hotter than that. On the plus side, there were huckleberries available! We had hoped to find some on our hike, but didn’t expect to be able to pick them from the car. Sweet!

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We hit the trail at 11:30, noting that there were no signs about a fire ban at the trailhead. That’s odd. It’s way too dry for campfires. We were glad for the cool shady hike as the temperatures continued to climb:

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Sometimes our pace slowed to a tasty crawl as we picked huckleberries:

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After 2.5 miles and an hour and 15 minutes we reached the PCT and turned north, passing Junction Lake. The lake was low enough that the outlet was bone dry:

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In fact, every single creek crossing was dry:

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We had planned to camp at Acker Lake, having read that there was a lovely campsite there. But we couldn’t find the trail down to it and in any case when we saw Bear Lake we decided that was a fine place to camp.

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That little peninsula at the east end of the lake has “day use only” and “no camping” signs:

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We managed to snag a campsite nearby, though:

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Then we went for a swim. Ah, that felt good!

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We spent the afternoon sitting in the shade by the lake, eating snacks and reading and staying cool. We saw several dozen backpackers arrive throughout the afternoon. There weren’t nearly enough campsites for all of them, so I don’t know where they ended up going. Some people just set up camp on the lakeshore where there were was plenty of dry land since the lake level was low.

In the late afternoon Greg took a nap while I went exploring. I hiked to trail’s end at Elk Lake, where there seemed to only be a handful of campsites. This lake only didn’t seem as good for swimming due its somewhat inaccessible shoreline.

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Back at Bear Lake I read until dinnertime. The sun disappeared behind the tree tops at 6, and we enjoyed a long dusk sitting by the lake eating dinner and drinking wine. It was warm enough that we were sitting there in short sleeves and I was SO glad we were not back home in our sweltering house. Despite all the people that we could see and hear, we were all dispersed enough that it didn’t matter. No one brought along a bluetooth speaker (thank god) and all the noises were just usual camp noises. Several people had campfires, though, which seemed crazy to me. Not only because the forest was SO dry, but because who wants a campfire when it’s 80 degrees out? I just don’t get it. If you need a campfire when you go backpacking, then don’t go during a drought.

Sunday morning our blue skies from the day before were gone (we didn’t know it yet, but the skies were hazy due to the Eagle Creek Fire that started the previous afternoon). We couldn’t smell smoke, though, and the lake was calm and peaceful. It was nice to just sit there enjoying our breakfast, tea, and the quiet morning. One of my favorite aspects of backpacking!

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Since we were staying two nights, today we decided to hike over to Lemei Rock and the nice viewpoint above Lake Wapiki.

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Along the way we checked out Deer Lake:

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And Clear lake:

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Now that we were out and about we could see just how bad the smoky haze was. The sunlight was orange.

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Along the last stretch to the viewpoint we got a view north to Mt. Rainier, whose summit was obscured by the smoky haze:

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Lemei Rock:

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We got to the viewpoint above Lake Wapiki. Mt. Adams was visible, but definitely shrouded in smoke:

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Lake Wapiki:

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Smoke and haze:

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At this point we had a signal and although I normally try to stay unplugged in the wilderness I thought I’d check the forecast. That’s when I learned about the Eagle Creek Fire that started the previous afternoon and about the 150 hikers who had been trapped overnight and had to hike out to Wahtum Lake in the morning. The whole story was horrifying. And now we knew why it suddenly got so very smoky overnight.

Greg did the crossword while I read on my Kindle, then I decided to pick some huckleberries further along the trail. I turned around to bring some berries back to Greg and saw a huge plume of smoke rising up to the west.

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The fire looked to be in the general direction of Bear Lake, so we quickly started hiking the three miles back there. From information we gathered from other hikers we figured out that the fire was near Blue Lake (which turned out to be slightly inaccurate; the fire was at East Crater), that it had just started this morning, and that everyone had to evacuate. Everyone at Bear Lake had already left. My guess is that they got the evacuation order shortly after we left on our day hike. Our afternoon plans for swimming and relaxing lakeside were not to be. As we packed up our site and the temperatures rose, I grumbled about the irresponsible jerk who didn’t properly put out their campfire and started a wildfire (they haven’t proven that’s what happened, but that’s my guess).

A firefighter we encountered told us the East Crater Trail back to our car was closed because the fire was pretty much on top of it. He told us to hike out to Cultus Creek Campground and a shuttle would take us back to our car. So we retraced our steps back up the Indian Heaven Trail, and when we passed Clear Lake we got a good view of the smoke. Holy crap.

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At Cultus Creek Campground they had closed the trail:

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Other backpackers also evacuated here, but there weren’t as many as I expected. I think most of them had already come out earlier in the day. After 90 minutes at the campground a FS guy admitted our best bet to get back to our car was with a member of the public, so we did just that. A huge thanks to Jack and Sydney, who were headed to Trout Lake and went out of their way to take us to our car. They couldn’t go the last 1.5 mile due to a ditch in the road that their low-clearance car couldn’t cross, so I ran the last stretch with just my keys and phone. I got to the car at 8pm after a long stressful day. So much for a relaxing day in the wilderness. But it could have been worse. We were safe, we were able to retrieve our gear, and our car didn’t burn up.

An hour later when we crossed the Bridge of the Gods, we got our first look at the Eagle Creek Fire and it was devastating. By then the news sites had reported that the fire was started due to teens playing with fireworks and we were shocked how big the fire got in such a short amount of time.

As for the East Crater Fire, it was intially reported to be 1,000 acres but once they got a look at the perimeter they revised that and today it’s listed as 467 acres. Cause is still listed as “under investigation”. I asked the GPNF on Facebook why there was no campfire ban in effect but they didn’t respond.

Video:

High Rock Lookout

Sunday, July 30: High Rock Lookout!

High Rock Lookout

After doing the Tatoosh Trail the day before, today we did the shorter easier hike to High Rock Lookout. We’d had to pitch camp alongside the road the night before, being unable to find anywhere else to stay (hotel or campground).

Fortunately this rushing stream blocked out the noise of the ocasional passing car:

On the drive to the trailhead we got stuck behind a SLOW Impreza that was crawling along, even on the parts where there weren’t potholes. But we finally arrived and from the car we could see our destination, the tiny-looking fire lookout perched way up on the peak:

High Rock Trail

We hit the trail and saw a “workers” sign. We later learned it was a trail crew from the Washington Conservation Corps. We saw signs of their earlier work cutting the beargrass back from the trail:

High Rock Trail

The trail climbs steeply up, up, up through the trees:

High Rock Trail

It’s a bit rough in spots:

High Rock Trail

A little ways before reaching the top you get a peek at Mt. Rainier:

High Rock Trail

The trail comes out at the base of the sloping summit, with the old lookout perched above:

High Rock Lookout

High Rock Lookout

The lookout hasn’t been staffed in awhile and has been heavily vandalized. For some reason people have written all over the windows. The south wall has been shored up with supports:

High Rock Lookout

High Rock Lookout

The view is pretty fabulous. Mt. Rainier to the north:

High Rock Lookout

Mt. Adams to the south:

High Rock Lookout

High Rock Lookout

High Rock Lookout

Mt. St. Helens:

High Rock Lookout

High Rock Lookout

Looking west:

High Rock Lookout

To the east we could see the meadows of Tatoosh Peak we had traversed the day before. It hadn’t occurred to us to look for High Rock when we over there, but we don’t own binoculars so probably couldn’t have seen it anyway:

High Rock Lookout

We could see Mt. Hood way off in the distance too:

High Rock Lookout

High Rock Lookout

We hung out a the summit for awhile soaking up the fabulous views. This is one popular trail, and we saw plenty of people up here. We also saw plenty of bugs. It was breezy at first, but when the winds calmed we were swarmed with flying ants. they didn’t bite, But were very annoying. Also annoying: the target shooters somewhere in the valley below us.

We headed down, passing dozens of people on their way up. While looking for an off-trail geocache on the way down, Greg got this iPhone shot of the lookout and Mt. Rainier:

High Rock Lookout

This is a nice short hike with great views. Glad we got to do it on such a clear day! Two days later on August 2 the entire Pacific Northwest became choked with smoke as shifting winds brought wildfire smoke from British Columbia, creating poor air quality and eliminating all views.

Tatoosh Trail

On Saturday Greg and I hiked up the Tatoosh Trail to the site of the old Tatoosh Lookout. I believe this summit is commonly called Tatoosh Peak, although on the topo map it is simply labeled “Tatoosh.” (Also, to confuse things, I believe this ridge is called Tatoosh Ridge, whereas the peaks just north of here are the Tatoosh Range.) From Tatoosh Peak one gets amazing views of Mt. Rainier and other peaks.

Tatoosh Trail

We had intended to stay in Packwood on Friday night so we could get an early start in the morning. We made the mistake of using Expedia to book a hotel and the hotel got overbooked. Expedia was not able to find us a room anywhere in the vicinity so we chose instead to stay in Portland and get up at 4am to hit the road at 5am. By the time we hit the trail at 8:50 we had been awake for nearly five hours already.

Tatoosh Trailhead

The first two miles climbs relentlessly uphill through the trees.

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

Then things started opening up and we started getting views of Dixon Mountain:

Tatoosh Trail

And we got a glimpse of the huge meadows we would be traversing soon:

Tatoosh Trail

We started passing through nice meadows of wildflowers including beargrass that was WAY past peak. We never would see beargrass that was still blooming on this hike, but the other wildflowers more than made up for it.

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

As we climbed, we started to see quite a lot of valerian in bloom. We didn’t know it yet, but we would see thousands of this wildflower along the entire trail:

Tatoosh Trail

We started leaving the mixed tree/meadow zone and emerged into the big sloping meadow we saw earlier. The wildflower show continued:

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

At 2.7 miles we reached the junction with the Tatoosh Lakes Trail. It’s 1.4 miles round-trip to go to the lakes and back to the main trail and we hoped to do this on our way down.

Tatoosh Trail

Past this junction is when things really started to get jaw-dropping. Behind us Mt. Rainier loomed over the ridge and the further we went, the more of the mountain we could see. We kept turning around to look at it.

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

At around three miles we passed this nice spot that would make a good campsite (and indeed it looks like people have camped here). We stopped here briefly for a snack but didn’t pause long due to the numerous biting flies. It would be great to backpack up here, but there is no water whatsoever and those first two miles of steep uphill loaded down with enough water for two days would be grueling.

Tatoosh Trail

We could see Mt. Adams:

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

And Mt. St. Helens:

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

A quarter mile beyond the campsite is a confusing intersection where a user trail on the left ascends an unnamed 6,050′ peak and another user trail on the right goes to a good viewpoint and lunch stop. We went straight to continue on the Tatoosh Trail, which traverses yet another huge meadow:

Tatoosh Trail

Notice the huge scar of a landslide on the right:

Tatoosh Trail

I can’t find any information about when this landslide happened, but it seems to have been at least a few years ago. The trail across it has not been fixed and it’s a bit of a scramble to get across:

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

There were a few other sketchy sections where the trail needs some serious maintenance:

Tatoosh Trail

Onward we hiked, looking back for the occasional glimpse of Mt. Rainier:

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

At 4.8 miles we reached the junction. From here the Tatoosh Trail continues south to a trailhead on Road 5290 but we would be doubling back and climbing up to make the last 0.7 mile push to the peak. The junction appears to be unsigned but then we spotted an old weathered sign on a tree:

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

The last bit of climbing to the summit proved to be incredibly spectacular as the trail followed a ridge bursting with millions of wildflowers. It was incredible!

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

Looking back, we could see the Goat Rocks and Mt. Adams:

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

And Mt. Hood way off in the distance:

Tatoosh Trail

Last push to the top, which had one lingering snowfield across the trail right at the summit:

Tatoosh Trail

5.5 miles of hiking and 3,500′ of elevation gain and we made it!

Tatoosh Trail

The old Tatoosh fire lookout is long gone. All that remains are the concrete footings and melted glass:

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

I found a summit register near one of the footings. It had no log inside so I added a few sheets of paper:

Tatoosh Trail

There is a heart-shaped tarn below the summit which I suppose could be a water source if one camped up here, although I’m not sure how one would safely get down there:

Tatoosh Trail

Looking east:

Tatoosh Trail

Looking back at the summit:

Tatoosh Trail

We stayed here for an hour enjoying the view but the biting flies were AWFUL and we had a long hike back down, so we reluctantly departed and began our trek back down through the wildflowers.

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

Tatoosh Trail

I really wanted to do the side trail to Tatoosh Lakes, but we were running very low on water (and hadn’t brought the filter) and we were very very tired. As it was, my feet were really sore the last few miles descending back to the car. Hopefully we can come back someday and see the lakes. On the way down two guys passed us heading back to their car and they were carrying fishing poles. I asked if they had gone to the lakes and they said they had. I asked how the bugs were and they said the bugs were really bad. So I didn’t feel as bad about missing the lakes on this trip.

This is definitely a hard hike. Our GPS stats came out to 11.2 miles with 4,000′ elevation gain (there is uphill in both directions). Plus there is virtually no shade except for that first two miles of trail. But I’ve been wanting to do this one for years and it was even better than I hoped it would be!

TatooshTrailMap

Silver Star Mountain Flower Bonanza

Greg and I braved the godawful Road 4109 to access the north trailhead on Silver Star Mountain on July 9. We’re glad we did, but it’s the last time we’ll take our car on that road. More on that at the end of the post.

We did our usual hike: follow the old road up for a mile (the hiking trail that parallels it for a short bit isn’t nearly as scenic) then pick up Ed’s Trail. The flowers were totally glorious:

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Tiger lilies

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

The views weren’t too shabby:

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Ed’s Trail connects back up with the old road, which we followed to the summit:

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Mt. St. Helens and Mt. Rainier:

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

The Goat Rocks and Mt. Adams:

Silver Star Mountain

Mt. Hood:

Silver Star Mountain

Mt. Jefferson and the Three Sisters:

Silver Star Mountain

Smoke from the Dry Creek Fire near Trout Lake:

Silver Star Mountain

The hike back down via the old road was spectacular, with lots of wildflowers:

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

Silver Star Mountain

One last view of Mt. Hood before the trail drops down to the trailhead:

Mt. Hood

Here is a video of the hike:

You’ll see at the very end of that video some footage we took driving back down Road 4109. This road has always been awful, but it’s gotten really bad. High clearance vehicles are required, preferably AWD/4WD for some steep sections where it’s hard to get traction when going so slow. My theory is that the Forest Service deliberately doesn’t maintain this road in order to keep the crowds down and protect the fragile meadows, but I don’t know if that’s true. Next year we’ll start from the Grouse Vista Trailhead on the other side of the mountain. It means a MUCH longer hike to get to the wildflowers, but at least the drive will be easier.